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Whittlesey and District Neighbourhood Watch

Whittlesey and District Neighbourhood Watch

Creating safer, stronger and active communities

Dog Theft

Dog theft is on the rise, and as such, Neighbourhood Watch and Dogs Trust are urging the public to be vigilant and report any suspicious activity. In 2016 alone, nearly 1,800 instances of dog theft were reported to police forces across England and Wales. Information obtained by Dogs Trust through a Freedom of Information request also reveals that gardens, closely followed by the home, are the most common areas from which dogs were reported stolen.

Any kind of theft is distressing, but when a dog is stolen,  the experience can be even more distressing as many consider their dog is a part of the family.

The most common breed of  dog reported as stolen is the Staffordshire Bull-terrier, followed then by the Jack Russell, Chihuahua and the Bulldog. But Dogs Trust warns that any dog, whatever the breed, is at risk of theft if left unsupervised.

Your dog can be kept much safer by making small changes to the garden and the home, and by registering to a local Neighbourhood Watch scheme. When it comes to garden security aim to keep the dog in, but keep thieves out!

Dogs Trust advises never to leaving your dog unattended, and has put together the following advice on how to help protect your dog from the risk of theft and what to do should the worst happen.

Whether you own a dog or not, intruders should not be able to access your garden or property.

More advice is available: 

Protecting your dog against theft on the the Blue Cross site

The Pets Bureau site is also full of helpful ideas.

Travelling with Dogs

Travelling with Dogs

Many consider pets to be a part of our family. Travelling by car with dogs has become common, unfortunately, it is common place to see cars on the roads with unrestrained dogs leaning out of the window appearing as though they may jump out at any moment. I am always concerned that the dog may come to some harm should the vehicle be forced to brake swiftly or even become involved in a collision.

So, what is the law on driving with dogs?

Read more: Travelling with Dogs

Tick Warning

There has been an increase in the number of ticks found on pets possibly due to warm and damp weather.

  • Ticks carrying disease are found across the UK
  • They can be very small and bites can be unnoticed
  • Ticks are most active from March to October, but they can be active on mild winter days
  • You will not feel the tick attach to you, so check your skin and that of children
  • The tick must be removed as soon as possible after it attaches and without squashing it. If you are not sure of how to remove a tick seek advice from a vet.

 Ticks feed on the blood of other animals. If a larval tick picks up an infection from a small animal, when it next feeds as a nymph it can pass the infection to the next animal or human it bites.

 They cannot jump or fly, but when ready for a meal will climb a nearby piece of vegetation and wait for a passing animal or human to catch their hooked front legs. The tick will not necessarily bite immediately, but will often spend some time finding a suitable site on the skin, so it is important to brush off pets and clothing before going inside.”

Once a tick has started to feed, its body will become filled with blood. Adult females can swell to many times their original size. As their blood sacs fill they generally become lighter in colour and can reach the size of a small pea, generally grey in colour. Larvae, nymphs and adult males do not swell as much as they feed, so the size of the tick is not a reliable guide to the risk of infection. If undisturbed, a tick will feed for around 5 to 7 days before letting go and dropping off.

The bite is usually painless and most people will only know they have been bitten if they happen to see a feeding tick attached to them.

The risk of infection increases the longer the tick is attached, but can happen at any time during feeding. As tick bites are often unnoticed, it may be difficult to determine how long it has been attached. Any tick bite should be considered as posing a risk of infection.

Lungworm

Lungworm is a common problem in southern areas of England so people all over the UK should be aware of it. 

How do dogs get lungworm?

 Dogs get lungworm by eating larvae found in infected snails, slugs or frogs. They can also accidentally eat infected tiny slugs if they are on a toy or their fur. The lungworm larvae then grow inside the dog and adult lungworms move through their body to live in their heart and blood vessels. This can cause heart problems, breathing problems and pneumonia but in mild cases infection can remain unnoticed by owners. After about 28 days the worms start to produce their own larvae which can lead to serious problems. It can cause haemorrhages in the lungs, liver, intestine, eyes and spinal cord but also pretty much anywhere in the body. If left untreated, it can be fatal in severe cases.

Read more: Lungworm

Dog Fouling

Street Scene Officers from Fenland District Council were invited to Alderman Jacobs School to speak to their assembly about the small minority of irresponsible dog owners who fail to clear up after their dogs, this followed on from upset and annoyed parents who contacted both FDC and the school regarding their children who, while walking to and from school, were having to dodge the dog mess left behind and some had got this on their shoes and were carrying it into school and home.

The students were invited to  get involved in a poster completion which will be judged and the winning poster will be displayed around Whittlesey in the next coming week, this is one way Fenland District Council is getting the community on board to help tackle  this issue and hopefully these posters will prick the conscience of the few dog owners who refuse to take responsibility for their dogs.

Look out for these posters which are displayed around Whittlesey !

Read more: Dog Fouling

Subcategories

 

 

This is the home page of the Meerkats.Why did we choose the Meerkat? The Meerkat belongs to the mongoose family. It is famous for standing upright looking out for eagles and hawks that might attack their community.


Meerkats Logo Small

A Meerkat is always careful.

Meerkats work together to keep themselves safe. When a deadly puff adder attacked a burrow the meerkats helped each other and carried all their babies to safety.


 When they want to be safe, meerkats go to their burrow.

 Like the meerkat you can learn to be watchful and help to keep yourself safe. Meerkats teach us not to let our guard down and work together to keep our community safe from dangers.

We do not live in the wild, but we do have to know about the world around us because sometimes other people, or things we do, can be unsafe. 

The Meerkat pages will help you to find out how you can help yourself and your friends to stay safe.